Multiple woofer subs - what benefits are there in these designs?

For discussion and learning purposes.

Talking about (not multiple subs) the following sub designs:

  1. dual driver sub design which have its 2 woofers dual opposed in the same cabinet; e.g. rythmik g22, kef’s new subs range

  2. dual driver sub design that has its woofers face different directions but not opposing directions in same cabinet. e.g. Ken kreisel’s push pull, MK’s push pull, arendal

  3. Sub design that have 3 drivers in the same cabinet (eg 1 active and 2 passive woofers). E.g. Dali P10DDS, starkesound SUB35

Besides smaller form factor for same output, what are the benefits that these designs bring compared to single bigger woofer subs on the below areas?

  • bass performance
  • distortion
  • bass coverage in the room
  • seat to seat consistency for freq below 200hz
  • tactile feel on the body/ particle movement

There must be some positives for the sound system brands to offer these designs.

I found this interesting article on dual opposed:
https://data-bass.com/#/articles/5cb4eb62079a580004e73249?_k=0ph329

Anyone can enlighten?

I volunteer to start the ball rolling ! :slight_smile:

1) dual driver sub design which have its 2 woofers dual opposed in the same cabinet; e.g. rythmik g22, kef’s new subs range

Distortion
From rythmik: dual opposed subwoofers mount two drivers on opposite walls of enclosures in an effort to reduce the reaction force exerted onto the enclsoure from drivers.

From kef: it places two drivers in a dual-opposing configuration—that is, mounted on opposite sides of a cabinet. They vibrate in phase with each other, moving inward and outward in unison. The force imparted to the cabinet from each woofer cancels out the force from the other woofer. This greatly reduces cabinet resonance, which can distort the sound, and prevents smaller subs from “dancing” across the floor.

In a way, this reduces distortion caused by cabinet shaking?

Seat to seat consistency for freq below 200hz:
The data bass article below is quite interesting. It suggests better seat to seat bass consistency below 200hz in a room? Backed up by measurements.any truth to this?

https://data-bass.com/#/articles/5cb4eb62079a580004e73249?_k=0ph329

Tactile feel on the body/ particle movement
My guess is - there is more particle velocity movement across the room compared to 1 sub? Any thoughts /views?

Was reading about this 2 days back


Copyright © 2020. AV Discourse. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by Discourse App.